Multisensory Monday- Syllable Sort

In Brainspring’s Phonics First® and Stuctures® programs, syllabication is one of the main components of the Five-Part Lesson Plan. The eight different syllable types are introduced one-at-a-time over a period of many, many lessons. Although students may use the Syllable Division Cards when identifying and labeling the different syllable types in the syllabication lessons, it is helpful for students to be able to quickly identify syllable types. This syllable sort activity provides hands-on practice for students working to learn the different syllable types. Making one is simple and quick.

Syllable Sort Activity

Download the Syllable Cards at the end of the post. Cut apart the individual word cards (alternately, teachers may make their own word cards). Consonant-LE and Schwa syllable types are not included because the focus of this game is on single syllables and both Consonant-LE and schwa syllables occur in multisyllabic words.

Next, write the known syllable types in columns or boxes on a large sheet of paper or whiteboard.

Finally, Students should select a word card, identify the syllable type, read the word, and then sort it into the correct syllable column or box.

Be sure to only use the introduced syllable types.  For example, if you have taught only Open and Closed syllables, only give students the word cards with Open and Closed syllables.

Use the included Pseudowords at your discretion.

For students who have learned Magic-E, include the Magic-E word cards.

For students who have learned through the Vowel Team AI, provide Open, Closed, Magic-E.  However, only include the Vowel Teams EA and AI. Because students would not have learned the other Vowel Teams (OA, EE, AY, OE), do not include those word cards in the Syllable Sort.

This makes a quick and easy review activity, intensive activity, or re-teaching tool. Students of all ages enjoy it, and it helps students to focus on the unique vowel sounds of each syllable type. Also, teachers or tutors can easily customize the activity to meet individual student needs while targeting specific skills.

DOWNLOAD FREE Syllable Sort Word Cards HERE

Tammi Brandon, M.Ed., CDP

Tammi Brandon is a Master Instructor and Education Consultant with Brainspring Educator Academy.


Bring Brainspring Orton-Gillingham multisensory instruction to your classrooms, transforming struggling K-12 readers into skilled learners through our effective, evidence-based approach.

For more information please visit brainspring.com or call 1-8007323211


 

Multisensory Monday- Spelling with Smores

This is a great multisensory spelling activity to accompany the “sm” beginning blends.  All you’ll need is some Marshmallows, a wooden skewer, and a marker.  If you allow snacks in your classroom, the students will be excited to find out they’ll be having a little treat, too!

Materials

Large Marshmallows
Wooden Skewers
Markers

Directions for Spelling Smores

Pass out 5 or 6 Marshmallows to each student. This is the amount that fits on each skewer. Dictate the words from the list below. The students will write them across the marshmallow. Make sure they use large, evenly spaced letters around the Marshmallow. As they pierce the Marshmallow through the skewer, they read the words aloud.
Alternatively, for more practice with these words, you can split the students up in pairs. Split the dictation words between the students and have them take turns reading the words to each other as they skewer them.

Word List

smell

smog

smash

smith

smug

smack

smock

 

Happy Smoring!

~Georgia Diamantopoulos

Georgia is a tutor at Brainspring Learning Center in Shelby Township.


Bring Brainspring Orton-Gillingham multisensory instruction to your classrooms, transforming struggling K-12 readers into skilled learners through our effective, evidenced -based approach.

For more information please visit brainspring.com or call 1-8007323211

 

 

 

Multisensory Monday- Greek & Latin Roots (hydro/aqua)

We’ve all heard words like “aqueduct” and “hydrogen” and maybe even words such as “hydrocephalus” and “aquarellist”. But, do you know how these words are all related? They hail from Greek (hydro) and Latin (aqua) and mean “water”.

Greek & Latin Roots

In Brainspring’s Structures® curriculum, the roots hydro/hydra and aqua are taught in Module 2. There are several phonics skills that may be taught (or re-taught) when it comes time to teach this lesson. For instance, Y making the long I sound may be reviewed; qu making the /kw/ sound could be re-taught; the concept of Open syllables could be taught or reviewed; and the schwa is another area that could be focused on. Additionally, the meaning of hydro/hydra and aqua can be taught using a multisensory activity.

Activity

DOWNLOAD the FREE Template here and provide a copy to your students. The students will either cut out the water droplets at the bottom of the page or may use blue construction paper and cut out water droplets. These water droplets and a cutout of the water spigot should be glued to a sheet of paper.  During dictation, students should write each word in a separate water droplet.

 

This activity reinforces the meaning of the root words hydro/hydra and aqua!

Tammi Brandon, M.Ed., CDP

Tammi Brandon is a Master Instructor and Education Consultant with Brainspring Educator Academy.

Brainspring’s Educator Academy helps teachers bring Orton-Gillingham based multisensory instruction to the classroom.

Our nationally accredited Phonics First® and Structures® programs help transform struggling readers into skilled learners with an effective, fun, multisensory approach.

For more information please visit brainspring.com or call 1-8007323211

 

Multisensory Monday- Clothespin Spelling Game

My younger students really seem to enjoy this simple spelling game. To make it, you will need some clothespins, a clothes hanger, and some letter stickers.  Assembly time is quick: Simply place one letter sticker on one side of each clothespin. The object of the game is to create as many words as you can using the clothespin letters. You can play this game cooperatively using only one hanger, or you can play the game competitively using one hanger for each player.

Materials
  • Clothespins (You can find clothespins at the dollar store!)
  • Clothes Hanger
  • Letter Stickers (Make sure letters will fit on the clothespins)
Directions

To play, turn all of the clothespins letter-side down. The first player chooses a clothespin and clips it onto the hanger in one of three designated word spots (the top “shoulder” areas or the “pants” area). Once a clothespin has been placed in its word spot, it can be moved within that word area, but it cannot move to another word spot (from “shoulder” to “pants” and vice versa).

The next player selects a clothespin and clips it into one of the word spots. Play continues until a word is made in each designated word spot. When extra letters begin to accumulate in the word spots, a player may elect to remove one letter per turn and return it face down to the draw pile of clothespins.

If playing cooperatively, players work together and build words on one hanger. If playing competitively, each player has her own hanger and tries to build three complete words before the other players build their words. Competitive players may also elect to give one point per letter in the word to encourage students to try to build longer words.   Use a predetermined word list for each student so that they can work on spelling Red Words or words with a specific sound or spelling rule.

Tammi Brandon, M.Ed., CDP

Tammi Brandon is a Master Instructor and Education Consultant with Brainspring Educator Academy.

Brainspring’s Educator Academy helps teachers bring Orton-Gillingham based multisensory instruction to the classroom. Our nationally accredited Phonics First® curriculum helps transform struggling readers into skilled learners with an effective, fun, multisensory approach.

For more information please visit brainspring.com or call 1-8007323211